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Birds of Prey (1930)

Birds of Prey, also known in the United States as The Perfect Alibi, is a 1930 British mystery film produced and directed by Basil Dean, from a screenplay he co-wrote with A.A. Milne from Milne's play which was known as The Perfect Alibi in the United States and The Fourth Wall in the United Kingdom. The film starred Dorothy Boyd, Robert Loraine, Warwick Ward, C. Aubrey Smith and Frank Lawton, and was produced at Beaconsfield Studios by Associated Talking Pictures.

A Honeymoon Adventure (1931)

A Honeymoon Adventure is a 1931 British thriller film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Benita Hume, Peter Hannen and Harold Huth. Written in collaboration by Rupert Downing and Basil Dean, it follows a brilliant scientist and his wife who go on honeymoon to Scotland where they are nearly kidnapped by agents of a foreign power. The film was shot at Beaconsfield Studios. Location shooting, including the railway scenes took place in Scotland.

Sally in Our Alley (1931)

Sally in Our Alley is a 1931 British romantic comedy drama film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Gracie Fields, Ian Hunter and Florence Desmond.

Looking on the Bright Side (1932)

Looking on The Bright Side is a 1932 British musical comedy film It was directed by Graham Cutts and Basil Dean and starring Gracie Fields, Richard Dolman and Betty Shale.

Nine Till Six (1932)

Nine till Six is a 1932 British drama film directed by Basil Dean and starring Louise Hampton, Elizabeth Allan and Florence Desmond. Produced by Basil Dean's Associated Talking Pictures, it was the first film made at Ealing Studios after the facility had been converted to sound.

The Bailiffs (1932)

The Bailiffs is a 1932 British comedy film, based on a sketch by Fred Karno and starring Flanagan and Allen, made by Associated Talking Pictures at Ealing Studios.

The Impassive Footman (1932)

The Impassive Footman is a 1932 British, low-budget "quota quickie" drama film directed by Basil Dean and starring Owen Nares, Betty Stockfeld, Allan Jeayes and George Curzon. The film's sets were designed by Edward Carrick. It was also released under the alternative title Woman in Bondage.

The Sign of Four (1932)

The Sign of Four is a 1932 British crime film directed by Graham Cutts and starring Arthur Wontner, Ian Hunter and Graham Soutten. The film is based on Arthur Conan Doyle's second Sherlock Holmes story The Sign of the Four. The film is also known as The Sign of Four: Sherlock Holmes' Greatest Case.

The Water Gipsies (1932)

The Water Gipsies is a 1932 British, low-budget "quota quickie" drama film. Directed by Maurice Elvey, it starred Ann Todd, Sari Maritza and Ian Hunter. It is an adaptation of the 1930 novel The Water Gipsies by A.P. Herbert. The film was made at Beaconsfield Studios. Vivian Ellis worked as the film's composer, and later used some of the music in the 1955 stage musical adaptation of the novel.

The Right to Live (1932)

The Right to Live is a 1932 British crime film made at Ealing Studios. It was directed by Albert Parker and starred Davy Burnaby, Pat Paterson and Francis L. Sullivan.

Loyalties (1933)

Loyalties is a 1933 British drama film directed by Basil Dean and starring Basil Rathbone, Heather Thatcher and Miles Mander. It is based on the John Galsworthy play Loyalties. The film addresses the theme of anti-Semitism. The film was part of an increased trend depicting mistreatment of Jews in British films during the 1930s, tied to the rising tide of anti-Semitism in Nazi Germany, but is unusual in its depiction of prejudice in Britain as most other films were set in a non-British, historical context.

The Fortunate Fool (1933)

The Fortunate Fool is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Norman Walker and starring Hugh Wakefield, Joan Wyndham and Jack Raine. It was made at Ealing Studios as a quota quickie. The film's sets were designed by the art director Wilfred Shingleton.

The House of Trent (1933)

The House of Trent is a 1933 British drama film directed by Norman Walker and starring Anne Grey, Wendy Barrie, Moore Marriott and Peter Gawthorne. It follows a doctor who faces both a scandal and a moral dilemma when a patient of his dies while he is making love to a press magnate's daughter. It was also released as Trent's Folly. The film was made at Ealing Studios.

This Week of Grace (1933)

This Week of Grace is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Gracie Fields, Henry Kendall and John Stuart. A poor, unemployed woman is made housekeeper at the estate of a wealthy duchess. It was promoted with the tagline "Cinderella in modern dress ". It includes songs written by Harry Parr-Davies, including "My Lucky Day " and "Happy Ending ".

Three Men in a Boat (1933)

Three Men in a Boat is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Graham Cutts and starring William Austin, Edmund Breon, Billy Milton and Davy Burnaby. It is based on the novel Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome which depicts three men and a dog's adventure during a boat trip along the River Thames.

Tiger Bay (1933)

Tiger Bay is a 1934 British film, starring the Chinese-American actor Anna May Wong, and directed by J. Elder Wills. The film is about a young Englishman abroad, Michael, who deliberately visits a tough Chinese district of Tiger Bay to test his strength. He falls in love and battles a protection racket.

To Brighton with Gladys (1933)

To Brighton with Gladys is a 1933 British comedy film directed by George King and starring Harry Milton, Constance Shotter and Kate Cutler. It was made at Ealing Studios as a quota quickie.

Autumn Crocus (1934)

Autumn Crocus is a 1934 British romance film directed by Basil Dean and starring Ivor Novello, Fay Compton and Muriel Aked. The film follows a teacher who falls in love with the married owner of the guest house in which she is staying during a holiday to Austria. It was based on Dodie Smith's first play Autumn Crocus, previously a West End hit for director Basil Dean. The film was made by Associated Talking Pictures at Ealing Studios, with art direction by Edward Carrick. It was the final film appearance of its star, Ivor Novello. A contemporary reviewer wrote, "Novello 's schoolboy knees under his Tyrolean shorts make the audience, if not the players, feel bashful".

Love, Life and Laughter (1934)

Love, Life and Laughter may refer to: Love, Life and Laughter (1923 film), a British drama Love, Life and Laughter (1934 film), a British comedy/drama

Rolling in Money (1934)

Rolling in Money is a 1934 British comedy film directed by Albert Parker and starring Isabel Jeans, Leslie Sarony and John Loder. The screenplay concerns an impoverished duchess who arranges a marriage for her daughter to a wealthy working-class London barber. It was an adaptation of the play Mr. Hopkinson by R. C. Carton.

Sing As We Go (1934)

Sing As We Go is a 1934 British musical film starring Gracie Fields, John Loder and Stanley Holloway. The script was written by Gordon Wellesley and J. B. Priestley.

Considered by many to be British music hall star Gracie Fields' finest vehicle, this film was written for her by leading novelist J.B. Priestley. In this morale-boosting depression movie, set in the industrial north of England, Fields stars as a resourceful, spunky working class heroine, laid off from her job in a clothing mill, who has to seek work in the seaside resort of Blackpool. This gives her the opportunity both to fall into many misadventures and, of course, to sing.

The decision to film on location brings the film a life and immediacy all too absent from most films of the period. The film provides us with a snapshot of life in a seaside resort in the 1930s. The final scene of the millworkers returning to the re-opened mill while Fields leads them in the rousing title song has become an almost iconic film cliché.

Sing As We Go (1934)

Sing As We Go is a 1934 British musical film starring Gracie Fields, John Loder and Stanley Holloway. The script was written by Gordon Wellesley and J. B. Priestley.

Considered by many to be British music hall star Gracie Fields' finest vehicle, this film was written for her by leading novelist J.B. Priestley. In this morale-boosting depression movie, set in the industrial north of England, Fields stars as a resourceful, spunky working class heroine, laid off from her job in a clothing mill, who has to seek work in the seaside resort of Blackpool. This gives her the opportunity both to fall into many misadventures and, of course, to sing.

The decision to film on location brings the film a life and immediacy all too absent from most films of the period. The film provides us with a snapshot of life in a seaside resort in the 1930s. The final scene of the millworkers returning to the re-opened mill while Fields leads them in the rousing title song has become an almost iconic film cliché.

Love on the Spot (1934)

Love on the Spot is a 1932 British musical film directed by Graham Cutts and starring Rosemary Ames, Richard Dolman and Aubrey Mather. The screenplay concerns two criminals who are reformed when they meet and fall in love.

The Perfect Flaw (1934)

The Perfect Flaw is a 1934 British crime film directed by H. Manning Haynes and starring Naomi Waters, Ralph Truman and William Hartnell. The screenplay concerns a clerk who is planning to murder a stockbroker but is foiled in the attempt.

The Secret of the Loch (1934)

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Honeymoon for Three (1935)

Honeymoon for Three may refer to the following films:

  • A Honeymoon for Three, a 1910 short starring J. Warren Kerrigan
  • Honeymoon for Three (1915 film), a British comedy directed by Maurice Elvey
  • Honeymoon for Three (1935 film), a British musical featuring Stanley Lupino
  • Honeymoon for Three (1941 film), an American romantic comedy starring Ann Sheridan and George Brent

It Happened in Paris (1935)

It Happened in Paris is a 1935 British romantic comedy film directed by Carol Reed and Robert Wyler and starring John Loder, Nancy Burne, and Esme Percy. The film marked Reed's directorial debut, and after working on this film with Wyler he was the sole director on his next film Midshipman Easy. The film is also notable for John Huston's contributions to the screenplay.

An American millionaire's son travels to France to study art, and falls in love in Paris.

Look Up and Laugh (1935)

Look Up and Laugh is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Basil Dean and starring Gracie Fields, Alfred Drayton and Douglas Wakefield. The film is notable for featuring an appearance by Vivien Leigh in an early supporting role.

Lorna Doone (1935)

Lorna Doone is a 1934 British historical drama film directed by Basil Dean and starring Victoria Hopper, John Loder and Margaret Lockwood. It is based on the novel Lorna Doone by R.D. Blackmore. This was the third screen version of the novel, and the first with sound; a further cinema adaptation followed in 1951.

It was shot partly on location in Somerset. The film's sets were designed by the art director Edward Carrick.

Midshipman Easy (1935)

Midshipman Easy is a 1935 British adventure film directed by Carol Reed and starring Hughie Green, Margaret Lockwood and Harry Tate. The screenplay concerns a young man who runs away from home, joins the navy and goes to sea in the 1790s. He rescues a captive woman from a Spanish ship and battles pirates and smugglers. The film was based on the novel Mr Midshipman Easy (1836) by Frederick Marryat.

No Limit (1935)

No Limit is a 1935 British musical comedy starring George Formby and Florence Desmond. The film, which was directed by Monty Banks, was made on location at the TT motorcycle race on the Isle of Man. It was the first of eleven films that Formby made with Associated Talking Pictures.

Although Formby had already made two films which returned their very-low budget many times over, No Limit was the film that put him on the road to stardom. It is still regarded as one of his best and funniest featuring good songs, humorous scenes and numerous stunts.

Play Up the Band (1935)

Play Up the Band is a 1935 British musical comedy film directed by Harry Hughes and starring Stanley Holloway, Betty Ann Davies and Leslie Bradley. The film was made at Ealing Studios by the independent company City Films. The film's sets were designed by art director R. Holmes Paul. Location shooting took place at the Crystal Palace, which burnt down the following year.

The Dictator (1935)

The Dictator is a 1935 British historical drama film directed by Victor Saville and starring Clive Brook, Madeleine Carroll, Emlyn Williams and Helen Haye. The film depicts a dramatic episode in Danish history: the tumultuous relationship between King Christian VII of Denmark and his English consort Caroline Matilda in 18th century Copenhagen and the Queen's tragic affair with the royal physician and liberal reformer Johann Friedrich Struensee. The film is loosely based on real events.

The Public Life of Henry IX (1935)

The Public Life of Henry the Ninth is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Bernard Mainwaring and starring Leonard Henry, Betty Frankiss, and George Mozart. This film was the first film made by Hammer Productions, and was Henry's film debut. It is set largely in the bar of the Henry VIII public house, with the title alluding to the 1933 Oscar-winning film The Private Life of Henry VIII. Originally released in 1935 by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, it was released again in 1940, this time by Exclusive. It is on the BFI 75 Most Wanted list of lost films.

The Silent Passenger (1935)

The Silent Passenger is a British black-and-white mystery film produced in 1935 at Ealing Studios, London. This was the first film outing for novelist Dorothy L. Sayers' fictional amateur sleuth Lord Peter Wimsey.[citation needed] It was based on an original story written by Sayers specifically for the screen. Her amateur sleuth was portrayed as a somewhat eccentric imbecile who solved murders in spite of himself.

A Woman Alone (1936)

A Woman Alone is a 1936 British drama film directed by Eugene Frenke and starring Anna Sten, Henry Wilcoxon and Viola Keats. It was also released as Two Who Dared. An officer becomes entangled in a love affair with a woman who works as a maid.

Calling the Tune (1936)

Calling the Tune was a 1936 British musical drama film directed by Reginald Denham and Thorold Dickinson and starring Adele Dixon, Sally Gray and Sam Livesey. It was based on a play written by the Irish MP and novelist, Justin Huntly McCarthy first published in 1913. It was made at Ealing Studios The film's sets were designed by the art director R. Holmes Paul.

Cheer Up (1936)

Cheer Up is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Leo Mittler and starring Stanley Lupino, Sally Gray and Roddy Hughes. It was made at Ealing Studios by Lupino's own independent production company. An impoverished team of composer and songwriter try to secure financial backing for their new musical, with the assistance of a struggling actress working as a housemaid.

Dreams Come True (1936)

Dreams Come True is a 1936 British musical film directed by Reginald Denham and starring Frances Day, Nelson Keys and Hugh Wakefield. The film is based on the 1924 operetta Clo-Clo by Franz Lehar and Bela Jenbach in an English adaptation by Bruce Sievier. It was made at Ealing Studios. It was one of a large number of operetta films made during the decade.

Keep Your Seats, Please (1936)

Keep Your Seats, Please is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring George Formby, Florence Desmond and Alastair Sim. It marked the film debut of the child star Binkie Stuart. The film was made by Associated Talking Pictures. The film follows a farcical plot based on the Russian satirical novel The Twelve Chairs by Ilya Ilf and Yevgeni Petrov. The film features Formby's signature tune, "When I'm Cleaning Windows".

Laburnum Grove (1936)

Laburnum Grove is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Carol Reed and starring Edmund Gwenn, Cedric Hardwicke and Victoria Hopper. It was based on the 1933 play of the same name written by J. B. Priestley.

Queen of Hearts (1936)

Queen of Hearts is a 1936 British musical comedy film directed by Monty Banks and starring Gracie Fields, John Loder and Enid Stamp-Taylor.

The House of the Spaniard (1936)

The House of the Spaniard is a 1936 British comedy thriller film directed by Reginald Denham and starring Allan Jeayes, Peter Haddon and Brigitte Horney. It is set in Lancashire and Spain, during the ongoing Spanish Civil War. It was shot at Ealing Studios in west London, England, and on location in Lancashire and Spain. Art direction was by Holmes Paul. It was based on a novel by Arthur Behrend.

The Lonely Road (1936)

The Lonely Road is a 1936 British drama film directed by James Flood and starring Clive Brook, Victoria Hopper, Nora Swinburne and Malcolm Keen. It was based on the novel Lonely Road by Nevil Shute, and was released in the United States as Scotland Yard Commands.

Tropical Trouble (1936)

Tropical Trouble is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Harry Hughes and starring Douglass Montgomery, Betty Ann Davies and Alfred Drayton. It was based on the novel Bunga-Bunga by Stephen King-Hall. A series of misunderstandings leads to a colonial governor's wife suspecting him of an affair with his assistant.

Whom the Gods Love (1936)

Whom the Gods Love is a 1936 British biographical film directed by Basil Dean and starring Stephen Haggard, Victoria Hopper and John Loder. The film portrays the life of the Eighteenth Century Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. It was also released under the alternative title Mozart.

Brief Ecstasy (1937)

Brief Ecstasy is a 1937 British drama film directed by Edmond T. Gréville and starring Paul Lukas, Hugh Williams, Linden Travers and Marie Ney. It was made at Ealing Studios.

Feather Your Nest (1937)

Feather Your Nest is a 1937 British musical comedy film directed by William Beaudine and starring George Formby, Polly Ward and Enid Stamp-Taylor.

Keep Fit (1937)

Keep Fit is a 1937 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Kay Walsh and Guy Middleton. Formby was at his British top box-office peak when this comedy was made.

Secret Lives (1937)

Secret Lives is a 1937 British war drama film directed by Edmond T. Gréville and starring Brigitte Horney, Neil Hamilton and Raymond Lovell. It was made at Ealing Studios by the independent Phoenix Films. The screenplay concerns a young woman who is recruited into the French secret service. The film is also known by the alternative title of I Married a Spy.

Take a Chance (1937)

Take a Chance is a 1937 British comedy sports film directed by Sinclair Hill and starring Claude Hulbert, Binnie Hale and Henry Kendall. It depicts farcical events in the horse racing world.

The Girl in the Taxi (1937)

The Girl in the Taxi is the English-language adaptation by Frederick Fenn and Arthur Wimperis of the operetta Die keusche Susanne (1910 in Magdeburg), with music by Jean Gilbert. The German original had a libretto by Georg Okonkowski. The story begins with a man and a woman, both married, who flag the same taxi and then decide to share it, as they have the same restaurant destination. Various naughty supper rendezvous, and much hiding under tables or behind screens, ensue.

The musical opened at the Lyric Theatre in London, produced by Philip Michael Faraday, on 5 September 1912 and ran for 385 performances. It starred Yvonne Arnaud as Suzanne, Arthur Playfair as Baron Dauvray, and Charles H. Workman as M. Pomarel. B. W. Findon, writing in The Play Pictorial called this "The merriest of musical farces" The piece toured internationally, including a production by J. C. Williamson's opera company in Australasia in 1915, starring Workman.

Film versions were made in 1921 (an American film) and in 1937 (a British film). The show was adapted back into French by Mars and Desvallières and produced in Paris and then Lyon in 1913 as La chaste Suzanne. It was also successful in South America in Italian (La casta Susana) and in Spanish (La chasta Suzanna).

The High Command (1937)

The High Command is a 1937 British drama film directed by Thorold Dickinson and starring Lionel Atwill, Lucie Mannheim and James Mason.

The Show Goes On (1937)

The Show Goes On is a 1937 British musical comedy film directed by Basil Dean and starring Gracie Fields, Owen Nares and John Stuart.

Who's Your Lady Friend? (1937)

Who's Your Lady Friend? is a 1937 British comedy film directed by Carol Reed and starring Frances Day, Vic Oliver and Betty Stockfeld. The secretary of a beauty specialist accidentally brings the wrong person back from the railway station, triggering a series of confusions. It was based on a comedy play by Béla Jenbach and Rudolf Österreicher, which had previously been made into an Austrian film The Gentleman Without a Residence three years earlier. It was an independent production made at Ealing Studios.

I See Ice (1938)

I See Ice is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Kay Walsh and Betty Stockfeld. The film depicts the adventures of a photographer working for a London newspaper. It features the songs "In My Little Snapshot Album", "Noughts And Crosses" and "Mother What'll I Do Now".

It's in the Air (1938)

It’s in the Air is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Polly Ward and Jack Hobbs. It was released in the United States with the alternative title George Takes the Air in 1940.

Penny Paradise (1938)

Penny Paradise is a 1938 British comedy film directed by Carol Reed and starring Edmund Gwenn, Betty Driver and Jimmy O'Dea. It was an early directorial assignment for Reed, and along with many other British productions of the era such as the same year's better-known Reed-directed Bank Holiday, is described as: "...belonging to a wider studio tradition of modest representation of ordinary British life."

The Gaunt Stranger (1938)

The Gaunt Stranger (released as The Phantom Strikes in the US) is a 1938 British mystery thriller film directed by Walter Forde. It stars Sonnie Hale, Wilfrid Lawson and Alexander Knox.

The Ware Case (1938)

The Ware Case is a 1938 British drama film directed by Robert Stevenson and starring Clive Brook, Jane Baxter and Barry K. Barnes. It is an adaptation of the play The Ware Case (1915) by George Pleydell Bancroft, which had previously been made into two silent films, in 1917 and 1928. It had been a celebrated stage vehicle for Sir Gerald Du Maurier. The film was made at Ealing Studios with Stately home exteriors shot in the grounds of Pinewood. Oscar Friedrich Werndorff worked as set designer. In Forever Ealing, George Perry wrote, "The Ware Case is a stagey, melodramatic piece. But it was made on schedule within its budget, and was thus able to go into profit."

Let's Be Famous (1939)

Let's Be Famous is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Walter Forde and starring Jimmy O'Dea, Betty Driver and Sonnie Hale. It was made by Associated Talking Pictures, with shooting beginning in November 1938. The film's art direction was by the Austrian Oscar Werndorff, in his final production.

Trouble Brewing (1939)

Trouble Brewing is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins and starring George Formby, Googie Withers and Gus McNaughton. It was made by Associated Talking Pictures, and includes the songs "Fanlight Fanny" and "Hitting the Highspots Now." The film is based on a novel by Joan Butler. The film's sets were designed by art director Wilfred Shingleton.

The Four Just Men (1939)

The Four Just Men, also known as The Secret Four, is a 1939 British thriller film directed by Walter Forde and starring Hugh Sinclair, Griffith Jones, Edward Chapman and Frank Lawton. It is based on the novel The Four Just Men by Edgar Wallace. There was a previous silent film version in 1921. This version was produced by Ealing Studios, with sets designed by Wilfred Shingleton. The Four Just Men was re-released in 1944 with an updated ending featuring newsreel of Winston Churchill and the Allied war effort as a fulfilment of the ideals of the Four. The adviser on the House of Commons of the United Kingdom scenes was Aneurin Bevan.

There Ain't No Justice (1939)

There Ain't No Justice is a 1939 British sports drama film directed by Pen Tennyson and starring Jimmy Hanley, Edward Chapman and Edward Rigby. The film is based on the 1937 novel of the same name by James Curtis.

Young Man's Fancy (1939)

Young Man's Fancy is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Robert Stevenson and starring Anna Lee, Griffith Jones, and Seymour Hicks. An aristocratic Englishman is unhappily engaged to a brewery heiress but meets Ada, an Irish human cannonball, during a visit to a music hall and falls in love with her. Together they are trapped in Paris during the Siege of Paris. The screenplay was written by Roland Pertwee and Stevenson, with additional dialogue by Rodney Ackland and E.V.H. Emmett. The character of Ada, written especially for Anna Lee by Stevenson, her husband, is "based on Zazel, the original 'human cannon ball', who thrilled London audiences in the [eighteen] nineties by being shot from a cannon" — however, "for the purposes of the film … the period [of the screenplay] has been put back to the seventies".

Cheer Boys Cheer (1939)

Cheer Boys Cheer is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Walter Forde and starring Nova Pilbeam, Edmund Gwenn, Jimmy O'Dea, Graham Moffatt, Moore Marriott and Peter Coke.

Come on George (1939)

Come On George! is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Anthony Kimmins which stars George Formby, with Pat Kirkwood and Joss Ambler in support. It was made by Associated Talking Pictures. Hal Erickson wrote in Allmovie, "Come on George! was a product of George Formby's peak movie years." It concerns the world of horse racing, and Formby, who had once been a stable apprentice, did his own riding in the film. Songs featured are "I'm Making Headway Now", "I Couldn't Let The Stable Down", "Pardon Me", and "Goodnight Little Fellow, Goodnight".

Olympic Honeymoon (1940)

Olympic Honeymoon is a 1940 British comedy film directed by Alfred J. Goulding and starring Claude Hulbert, Monty Banks and Princess Pearl. The screenplay concerns a British honeymooner visiting Switzerland, who is mistaken for a leading ice hockey player and is enlisted to play for the England national team. It was based on the novel He and Ski by F. Dawson Gratrix and is sometimes known by the alternative title Honeymoon Merry-Go-Round.

Return to Yesterday (1940)

Return to Yesterday is a 1940 British comedy-drama film directed by Robert Stevenson and starring Clive Brook and Anna Lee. It was based on Robert Morley's play Goodness, How Sad. The film was made at Ealing Studios.

The Proud Valley (1940)

The Proud Valley is a 1940 Ealing Studios film starring the African-American actor Paul Robeson. Filmed on location in the south Wales coalfield, the heart of the main coal mining region of Wales, the film tells the story of a Black American miner and singer who gets a job in a mine and joins a male voice choir. It documents the hard realities of Welsh coal miners’ lives.

Let George Do It (1940)

Let George Do It (US: To Hell With Hitler) is a 1940 British black-and-white comedy musical war film directed by Marcel Varnel and starring George Formby. It was produced by Michael Balcon for Associated Talking Pictures and its successor, Ealing Studios, and distributed in the UK by ABFD. This was the first comedy from this studio to deal directly with the Second World War.

Convoy (1940)

Convoy is a 1940 British war film, produced by Ealing Studios, directed by Pen Tennyson and starring Clive Brook, John Clements and Edward Chapman. It was Tennyson's last film before being killed in a plane crash.

Saloon Bar (1940)

Saloon Bar is a 1940 British thriller film directed by Walter Forde. It was made by Ealing Studios and its style has led to comparisons with the later Ealing Comedies, unlike other wartime Ealing films which are different in tone.

Sailors Three (1940)

Sailors Three (released in the US as Three Cockeyed Sailors) is a 1940 British war comedy film directed by Walter Forde and starring Tommy Trinder, Claude Hulbert and Carla Lehmann. This was cockney music hall comedian Trinder's debut for Ealing, the studio with which he was to become most closely associated. It concerns three British sailors who accidentally find themselves aboard a German ship during the Second World War. Detailed surveys published in Britain in the early years of the war by the "Mass-Observation" organisation, showed the popularity of comedy with wartime cinema audiences. Films with the war as a subject were particularly well received, especially those movies showing the lighter side of service life, largely because many in the audience would soon be finding themselves in uniform. John Oliver writes in BFI screenonline, " to prepare such potential recruits for their own possible riotous and fun-packed life in the Royal Navy, Sandy Powell had already taken the shilling in All At Sea (d. Herbert Smith, 1939) before Tommy Trinder did likewise with Sailors Three, following his comic misadventures in the army in Laugh It Off (d. John Baxter) earlier that same year."

The Ghost of St. Michael's (1941)

The Ghost of St. Michael’s is a 1941 British comedy-thriller film, produced by Ealing Studios. Hay dropped work with Graham Moffatt and Moore Marriott in his previous film, Where's That Fire? and brought in Claude Hulbert as his sidekick in this film. Hay and Hulbert would act together again in My Learned Friend two years later.

Turned Out Nice Again (1941)

Turned Out Nice Again is a 1941 British comedy film starring Lancashire-born George Formby.

Ships with Wings (1941)

Ships with Wings is a 1941 British war film directed by Sergei Nolbandov and starring John Clements, Leslie Banks and Jane Baxter. During the Second World War the British fleet air arm fight the Germans in Greece. The film was made by Ealing Studios, but filmed at Fountain Studios in Wembley Park in northwest London.

The Black Sheep of Whitehall (1942)

The Black Sheep of Whitehall is a 1942 British black-and-white comedy war film, directed by Will Hay and Basil Dearden, and starring Will Hay, John Mills and Basil Sydney. It was produced by Michael Balcon and Ealing Studios.

The Big Blockade (1942)

The Big Blockade is a 1942 British black-and-white war propaganda film in the style of dramatised documentary. It is directed by Charles Frend and stars Will Hay, Leslie Banks, Michael Redgrave and John Mills. It was produced by Michael Balcon for Ealing Studios, in collaboration with the Ministry of Economic Warfare.

The Foreman Went to France (1942)

The Foreman Went to France (released in the USA as Somewhere in France ) is a 1942 British Second World War war film starring Clifford Evans, Tommy Trinder, Constance Cummings and Gordon Jackson. It was based on the real-life wartime exploits of Welsh munitions worker Melbourne Johns, who rescued machinery used to make guns for Spitfires and Hurricanes. It was an Ealing film made in 1941 with the support of the War Office and the Free French Forces. The script was by J.B.Priestley and reflects both optimism about an eventual victory and the sense that the post war world would have to be different from that of the 1930s. All of the 'heroes' are portrayed as ordinary people caught up in the war. The score was written by William Walton.

The Next of Kin (1942)

The Next of Kin, also known as Next of Kin, is a 1942 Second World War propaganda film produced by Ealing Studios. The film was originally commissioned by the British War Office as a training film to promote the government propaganda message that "Careless talk costs lives". After being taken on by Ealing Studios, the project was expanded and given a successful commercial release. After the war and up until at least the mid 1960s, services in British Commonwealth countries continued to use The Next of Kin as part of security training.

The Goose Steps Out (1942)

The Goose Steps Out is a British comedy film released in 1942. This film starred, and was co-directed by, the British comedian Will Hay. He shared directorial credit with Basil Dearden. It was Dearden’s first film as a director. The film was a big box office hit in Britain, but not in the U.S., where audiences failed to respond to the humour of Hay's pathetic, bumbling persona. The Goose Steps Out is also noted as the film debut of a young Peter Ustinov. The film's title refers to the Nazis' vigorous ceremonial marching, called "goose-stepping". It was the last appearance for Charles Hawtrey in a Will Hay film as Hay dropped him for wanting a bigger role. It was also Hay's last film on the subject of the Second World War.

Went the Day Well? (1942)

Went the Day Well? is a 1942 British war film adapted from a story by Graham Greene and directed by Alberto Cavalcanti. It was produced by Michael Balcon of Ealing Studios and served as unofficial propaganda for the war effort. It tells of how an English village is taken over by Nazi paratroopers. It reflects the greatest potential nightmare of many Britons of the time, although the threat of German invasion had largely receded by that point. It includes the first significant role of Thora Hird's career, and one of the last of C. V. France. The village location for some scenes was Turville in Buckinghamshire. In the film the village is named Bramley End and the entire incident is said to be called the Battle of Bramley End.

Nine Men (1943)

The council of Nine Men was a citizens board and a form of representational democracy in New Netherland. It replaced the previous councils, the Twelve Men and the Eight Men. Members of the council were elected in 1647, 1649, 1650 and 1652. On July 26, 1649, eleven current and former members of the board signed the Petition of the Commonality of New Netherland, which requested that the States General take action to encourage economic freedom and force local government like that in the Netherlands, removing the colony from the control of the Dutch West India Company. It became the basis for the municipal government when the city of New Amsterdam received its charter in 1653.

The Bells Go Down (1943)

The Bells Go Down is a 1943 black-and-white wartime film made by Ealing Studios. The reference in the title is to the alarm bells in the fire station that "go down" when a call to respond is made. The film is an ensemble piece that covers the period between 27 August 1939, and 9 September 1940, when World War II began and London was subjected to aerial bombing, and is a tribute to the solidarity of not just those engaged in service, but among the British people as a whole.

It was produced by Michael Balcon and directed by Basil Dearden and was intended to give praise to the British Auxiliary Fire Service (AFS). Although a plot employing fictitious landmarks and localities, many of the incidental shots were taken at actual fires caused by the air raids on London in the previous two years. A sub-plot depicted the rivalry between the part-time AFS and the full-time London Fire Brigade (the two brigades merged into the National Fire Service in 1941). The reasons for joining the service, the training and finally the work and tragedy during September 1940 Blitz on London were shown for several characters. The background narration was spoken by Leo Genn.

The film was released at nearly the same time as the similar Fires Were Started, a fictional "documentary" that used actual firemen instead of professional actors, and as a result was sometimes reviewed unfavorably by comparison.

The score was originally offered to William Walton, but for various reasons (possibly including that he had lost his own home in the Blitz) he offered it to his musical assistant Roy Douglas.

Undercover (1943)

Undercover is a major 1943 war film produced by Ealing Studios in London, originally titled Chetnik. It was filmed in Wales and released on 27 July 1943. The subject was the Yugoslav guerrilla movement in German-occupied Yugoslavia loosely based on the Draza Mihailovich resistance movement. The movie was produced by Sir Michael Balcon and directed by Sergei Nolbandov. It starred John Clements as Milosh Petrovitch, Mary Morris as Anna Petrovitch, his wife, Stephen Murray as Stephan Petrovitch, his brother, Michael Wilding as Constantine, and Stanley Baker as Petar. The movie was re-released in the United States in 1944 by Columbia Pictures under the title Underground Guerrillas. The Ealing movie was similar to the 20th Century Fox wartime film Chetniks! The Fighting Guerrillas (1943) made in the U.S. The plot revolves around a resistance movement that emerges in Yugoslavia after the German invasion in 1941. The guerrillas are able to blow up trains, engage in sabotage, and to battle German troops. In the final scene, the guerrillas are shown going into the Serbian mountains to continue their resistance struggle until the German forces are driven out of the country. The movie was released on DVD on 25 January 2010 by Optimum Home Entertainment in the UK.

My Learned Friend (1943)

My Learned Friend is a 1943 British, black-and-white, comedy, farce, directed by Basil Dearden with his regular collaborator, Will Hay, as the film's star in the role of William Fitch. The principal supporting roles were taken by Claude Hulbert and Mervyn Johns . Character roles went to Laurence Hanray as Sir Norman, Charles Victor as "Safety" Wilson, Ernest Thesiger as Ferris and Ronald Shiner as the Man in Wilson's café. It was produced by Michael Balcon, Robert Hamer and Ealing Studios. The film's title refers to a tradition in British law: when addressing either the court or the judge, a barrister refers to the opposing counsel using the respectful term, "my learned friend". It was the last film featuring Will Hay as he had an operation, however, it wasn't the last role in his career as he would star as "Doctor Muffin" in The Will Hay Programme that aired on the radio, the radio show began in 1944. The humour of the film was different from the humour of Hay's films he previously made with Moore Marriott and Graham Moffatt and the film had more of a dark humour than any of Hay's other films. Hay had planned to make more films with Claude Hulbert that had a dark humour, but it was Hay's last film due to illness.

San Demetrio London (1943)

San Demetrio London is a 1943 British World War II docudrama based on the true story of the 1940 salvage of the tanker MV San Demetrio by some of her own crew, who reboarded her after she had been set on fire by the German heavy cruiser Admiral Scheer and then abandoned, during the Battle of the Atlantic. The film was produced by Michael Balcon for Ealing Studios and directed by Charles Frend.

The Halfway House (1944)

The Halfway House is a 1944 British drama film directed by Basil Dearden and starring Mervyn Johns, his daughter Glynis Johns, Tom Walls and Françoise Rosay. The film tells the story of ten people who are drawn to stay in an old inn near the Welsh countryside. The film was shot at Barlynch Abbey on the Devon/Somerset border. BFI Screenonline writes, "The high quality personnel involved and the tight, professional scripting mark the film out as one of the earliest templates of what would become the traditional Ealing style."

For Those in Peril (1944)

For Those in Peril is a 1944 British war film produced by Ealing Studios that marked the directorial debut of Charles Crichton. The film was developed from a short story by Richard Hillary, an RAF pilot killed in action in January 1943. The basic and relatively slight storyline of For Those in Peril was an end to produce a film with a documentary feel and an element of wartime propaganda. The film stars Ralph Michael and David Farrar.

They Came to a City (1944)

They Came to a City is a 1945 British film directed by Basil Dearden adapted from a J. B. Priestley play. It stars John Clements, Googie Withers, Raymond Huntley, Renee Gadd, A. E. Matthews and others, and is notable for including a cameo guest appearance by Priestley as himself. The plot concerns the experiences of various people who have come to live in their "ideal" city, and explores their hopes and reasons for doing so. Many of the cast had also performed their roles in the original stage play. The film's art direction was by Michael Relph.

Champagne Charlie (1944)

Champagne Charlie is a 1944 British musical film directed by Alberto Cavalcanti and loosely based on the rivalry between the popular music hall performers George Leybourne (born Joe Saunders), who was called "Champagne Charlie" because he was the first artist to perform the song of that title, and Alfred Vance, who was known as "The Great Vance". Leybourne and Vance, portrayed by Tommy Trinder and Stanley Holloway, were London's big music hall stars of the 1860s and 70s, of the kind called lions comiques. In the film, they are "top of the bill" at their respective music halls. The film's female leads are a music hall owner and her daughter, portrayed by Betty Warren and Jean Kent. Champagne Charlie opens with a sing-along in a pub, and follows the rise of Leybourne as a music hall singer. The highlight of the film is a singing competition between the two protagonists. Leybourne sings "Ale Old Ale" and Vance replies with "Gin, Gin, Gin"; the competition continues, with the scene finally ending with the song of the title. The film is notable for its realistic approach to showing details of the audiences, venues and staff, with copious quantities of food and drink providing a vicarious delight for wartime audiences. In 1944, Champagne Charlie was typical of feature films designed to raise morale and generate goodwill.

Fiddlers Three (1944)

Fiddlers Three is a 1944 British black-and-white comedy with music. The film was produced by Michael Balcon and directed by Harry Watt. The cast included Tommy Trinder, Sonnie Hale, Frances Day, Francis L. Sullivan, Diana Decker and Elisabeth Welch. Making their film debuts were James Robertson Justice, and Kay Kendall near the bottom of the cast list, as the "Girl Who Asks About Her Future At Orgy". The film follows the adventures of two sailors and a Wren who are struck by lightning and transported back to Ancient Rome, where they are accepted as seers. The film was called While Nero Fiddled on its USA release. It is a loose sequel to the 1940 film Sailors Three which had also starred Trinder. The film was only moderately successful at the British Box Office but proved to be a major hit in Australia.

Johnny Frenchman (1945)

Johnny Frenchman is a 1945 British film produced by Ealing Studios and directed by Charles Frend. The film was produced by Michael Balcon from a screenplay by T.E.B. Clarke, with cinematography by Roy Kellino.

Painted Boats (1945)

Painted Boats (US titles The Girl on the Canal or The Girl of the Canal) is a black-and-white British film directed by Charles Crichton and released by Ealing Studios in 1945. Painted Boats, one of the lesser-known Ealing films of the period, is brief (63 minutes long), uses a little-known cast and has a slight storyline. It is however considered significant by waterways enthusiasts as a fictionalised documentary, providing a rare extensive filmic depiction of a long-gone way of life on England's working canal system in the 1940. The narration was by Louis MacNeice, including some verse specially written to suit the onscreen action, most notably the sequence in which the narrow boat is being 'legged' through one of the tunnels.

Dead of Night (1945)

Dead of Night is a 1945 British anthology horror film (a gothic or horror anthology) made by Ealing Studios; the individual stories were directed by Alberto Cavalcanti, Charles Crichton, Basil Dearden and Robert Hamer. The film stars Mervyn Johns, Googie Withers, Sally Ann Howes and Michael Redgrave. The film is probably best-remembered for the ventriloquist's dummy episode with Redgrave. Dead of Night stands out from British film of the 1940s, when few horror films were being produced in the country (horror films had been banned from production in Britain during the war), and it had an influence on subsequent British films in the genre. Both of the segments by John Baines were recycled for later films, and the possessed ventriloquist dummy episode was adapted as the audition episode of the long-running CBS radio series Escape.

Pink String and Sealing Wax (1945)

Pink String and Sealing Wax is a 1945 British drama film directed by Robert Hamer and starring Mervyn Johns, Googie Withers and Gordon Jackson. It is based on a play with the same name by Roland Pertwee. It was the first feature film Robert Hamer directed on his own.

The Captive Heart (1946)

The Captive Heart is a 1946 British war drama, directed by Basil Dearden and starring Michael Redgrave. It is about a Czechoslovak Army officer who is captured in the Fall of France and spends five years as a prisoner of war, during which time he forms a long-distance relationship with the widow of a British Army officer. The film was entered into the 1946 Cannes Film Festival. The film is partly based on the true story of a Czechoslovak officer in the RAF Volunteer Reserve, Josef Bryks MBE, and his relationship with a British WAAF, Gertrude Dellar, who was the widow of an RAF pilot.

Hue and Cry (1947)

Hue and Cry (1947) is a British film directed by Charles Crichton and starring Alastair Sim, Harry Fowler and Joan Dowling. It is generally considered to be the first of the Ealing comedies, although it is better characterised as a thriller for children. Shot almost entirely on location, it is now a notable historic document due to its vivid portrait of a London still showing the damage of the Second World War. London forms the backdrop of a crime-gangster plot which revolves around a working class children's street culture and children's secret clubs.

Nicholas Nickleby (1947)

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby is a 1947 British drama film directed by Alberto Cavalcanti and starring Cedric Hardwicke. The screenplay by John Dighton is based on the Charles Dickens novel The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1839). This first sound screen adaptation of the book followed silent films released in 1903 and 1912.

The Loves of Joanna Godden (1947)

The Loves of Joanna Godden is a 1947 British historical drama film directed by Charles Frend and produced by Michael Balcon. The screenplay was written by H. E. Bates and Angus MacPhail from the novel by Sheila Kaye-Smith. It stars Googie Withers, Jean Kent, John McCallum, Derek Bond, Chips Rafferty and Sonia Holm. Some scenes were shot by director Robert Hamer when Frend was ill, though he was uncredited. The music was composed by Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Frieda (1947)

Frieda is a 1947 British film, directed by Basil Dearden, screenplay by Angus MacPhail and Ronald Millar and was produced by Michael Balcon.

It Always Rains on Sunday (1947)

It Always Rains on Sunday is a 1947 British film adaptation of Arthur La Bern's novel by the same name, directed by Robert Hamer. The film has been compared with the poetic realism movement in the French cinema of a few years earlier by the British writers Robert Murphy, in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, and Graham Fuller.

Against the Wind (1948)

Against the Wind is a black-and-white British film directed by Charles Crichton and produced by Michael Balcon, released through Ealing Studios in 1948. Against the Wind is a World War II sabotage/resistance drama set in occupied Belgium, starring Robert Beatty, Jack Warner and Simone Signoret (in her first English-language film role).

Saraband for Dead Lovers (1948)

Saraband for Dead Lovers (released in the United States. as Saraband) is a 1948 British historical drama film directed by Basil Dearden and starring Stewart Granger and Joan Greenwood. It is based on the novel by Helen Simpson. Set in seventeenth century Hanover, it depicts the doomed romance between Philip Christoph von Königsmarck and Sophia Dorothea of Celle, the wife of the Elector of Hanover. Jim Morahan, William Kellner and Michael Relph were nominated for the Academy Award for Best Art Direction - Set Decoration, Color.

Another Shore (1948)

Another Shore is a 1948 Ealing Studios comedy film/tragedy filmed in Ireland. It stars Robert Beatty as Gulliver Shields, an Irish customs official who dreams of living on a South Sea island; particularly Rarotonga. It is based on the book by Justice Kenneth Reddin. Robert Beatty was a Canadian actor who had a major success playing an IRA man in Odd Man Out.

Scott of the Antarctic (1948)

Scott of the Antarctic is a 1948 technicolour film which depicts Robert Falcon Scott's ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition and his attempt to be the first to reach the South Pole in Antarctica. John Mills played Scott, with a supporting cast which included James Robertson Justice, Derek Bond, Kenneth More, John Gregson, Barry Letts and Christopher Lee. Produced by Ealing Studios, the film was directed by Charles Frend and largely shot at the studios, with some landscape and glacier exteriors shot in the Swiss Alps and in Norway; no actual scenes were made in Antarctica, though some pre-war stock footage from Graham Land may have been used. The film was made in Technicolor. The script was by Ivor Montagu, Walter Meade and the novelist Mary Hayley Bell, Mills' wife. The film is also known for its score by Ralph Vaughan Williams that was later reworked into his Sinfonia antartica. The film is largely faithful to the real events of the ill-fated polar trek, with emphasis on the stoic character of Scott and the hostility of the Antarctic environment.

Eureka Stockade (1949)

Eureka Stockade is a 1949 British film of the story surrounding Peter Lalor and the gold miners' rebellion of 1854 at the Eureka Stockade in Ballarat, Victoria. It was produced by Ealing Studios and directed by Harry Watt.

Passport to Pimlico (1949)

Passport to Pimlico is a 1949 British comedy film made by Ealing Studios and starring Stanley Holloway, Margaret Rutherford and Hermione Baddeley. It was directed by Henry Cornelius and written by T. E. B. Clarke. The story concerns the unearthing of treasure and documents that lead to a small part of Pimlico to be declared a legal part of the House of Burgundy, and therefore exempt from the post-war rationing or other bureaucratic restrictions active in Britain at the time.

Whisky Galore! (1949)

Whisky Galore! is a 1949 British comedy film produced by Ealing Studios starring Basil Radford, Bruce Seton, Joan Greenwood and Gordon Jackson. It was the directorial debut of Alexander Mackendrick; the screenplay was by Compton MacKenzie, based on his 1947 novel Whisky Galore. The story – based on a true event – concerns a shipwreck off a fictional Scottish island, the inhabitants of which have run out of whisky; the islanders find out the ship is carrying 50,000 cases of whisky, which they salvage, against the opposition of the local Customs and Excise men.

Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949)

Kind Hearts and Coronets is a 1949 British black comedy film. It features Dennis Price, Joan Greenwood, Valerie Hobson and Alec Guinness; Guinness plays nine characters. The plot is loosely based on the novel Israel Rank: The Autobiography of a Criminal (1907) by Roy Horniman. It concerns Louis D'Ascoyne Mazzini, the son of a woman disowned by her aristocratic family for marrying out of her social class. After her death Louis decides to take revenge on the family, and to take the dukedom, by murdering the eight people ahead of him in succession to the title.

Train of Events (1949)

Train of Events is a 1949 British portmanteau film made by Ealing Studios and directed by Sidney Cole, Charles Crichton and Basil Dearden. It tells the story about a train that crashes into a stalled petrol tanker at a level (grade) crossing, and then flashes back and tells four different stories about some of the passengers before the crash.

A Run for Your Money (1949)

A Run for Your Money is a 1949 Ealing Studios comedy film starring Donald Houston and Meredith Edwards as two Welshmen visiting London for the first time. The supporting cast includes Alec Guinness, Moira Lister and Hugh Griffith.

The Blue Lamp (1950)

The Blue Lamp is a 1950 British police drama, directed by Basil Dearden and starring Jack Warner as veteran PC Dixon, Jimmy Hanley as newcomer PC Mitchell, and Dirk Bogarde as hardened criminal Tom Riley. The title refers to the blue lamps that traditionally hung outside British police stations (and often still do). The film became the inspiration for the 1955–1976 TV series Dixon of Dock Green, where Jack Warner continued to play PC Dixon until he was 80 years old (even though Dixon's murder is the central plot of the original film).

Dance Hall (1950)

Dance Hall is a 1950 British film directed by Charles Crichton. The film was an unusual departure for Ealing Studios at the time, as it tells the story about four women and their romantic encounters from a female perspective.

Bitter Springs (1950)

Bitter Springs is an Australian–British film directed by Ralph Smart and released in 1950. An Australian pioneer family leases a piece of land from the government in the Australian outback in 1900 and hires two inexperienced British men as drovers. Problems with local Aboriginal people arise over the possession of a waterhole. Much of the film was shot on location in the Flinders Ranges in South Australia.

Cage of Gold (1950)

Cage of Gold is a 1950 British drama film directed by Basil Dearden and starring Jean Simmons, David Farrar and James Donald.

The Magnet (1950)

The Magnet is a 1950 Ealing Studios comedy film featuring Stephen Murray, Kay Walsh and, in his first starring role, James Fox (then billed as William Fox). The story involves a young Wallasey boy, Johnny Brent (Fox), who obtains the eponymous magnet by deception, leading to much confusion. When he is acclaimed as a hero, he is shamed by his own sense of guilt.

Pool of London (1951)

Pool of London is a 1951 British noir crime film directed by veteran director Basil Dearden.

The Lavender Hill Mob (1951)

The Lavender Hill Mob is a 1951 comedy film from Ealing Studios, written by T.E.B. Clarke, directed by Charles Crichton, starring Alec Guinness and Stanley Holloway and featuring Sid James and Alfie Bass. The title refers to Lavender Hill, a street in Battersea, a district of South London, in the postcode district SW11, near to Clapham Junction railway station.

The Man in the White Suit (1951)

The Man In The White Suit is a 1951 science-fiction satirical comedy film made by Ealing Studios. It starred Alec Guinness, Joan Greenwood and Cecil Parker and was directed by Alexander Mackendrick. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing (Screenplay) for Roger MacDougall, John Dighton and Alexander Mackendrick (who was a cousin of Roger MacDougall).

Where No Vultures Fly (1951)

Where No Vultures Fly is a 1951 British film. It was released under the title Ivory Hunter in the United States. It was directed by Harry Watt and starred Anthony Steel and Dinah Sheridan. The film was inspired by the work of the conservationist Mervyn Cowie. The film's opening credits state that "the characters in this film are imaginary, but the story is based on the recent struggle of Mervyn Cowie to form the National Parks of Kenya." The title Where No Vultures Fly denotes areas where there are no dead animals.

His Excellency (1952)

His Excellency is a 1952 British comedy film directed by Robert Hamer and starring Eric Portman, Cecil Parker, Helen Cherry. It follows a blunt Yorkshireman and former trade union leader, who is sent to take over as Governor of a British-ruled island in the Mediterranean.

The Secret People (1952)

Secret People is a 1952 British drama film, directed by Thorold Dickinson and produced by Sidney Cole for Ealing Studios, with a screenplay from Thorold Dickinson, Wolfgang Wilhelm, Joyce Carey and Christianna Brand. Secret People stars Valentina Cortese, Serge Reggiani and Audrey Hepburn and premiered in the U.K. on 8 February 1952. The film provided Audrey Hepburn with her first significant film role, leading to her big breakthrough.

I Believe in You (1952)

I Believe in You is a 1952 film directed by Michael Relph and Basil Dearden. It stars Celia Johnson and Cecil Parker and is based on the book Court Circular by Sewell Stokes. Inspired by the recently successful The Blue Lamp, Relph and Dearden used a semi-documentary approach in telling the story of the lives of parole officers and their charges.

Mandy (1952)

Mandy is a 1952 British film about a family's struggle to give their deaf daughter a better life. It was directed by Alexander Mackendrick and is based on the novel The Day Is Ours by Hilda Lewis. It stars Phyllis Calvert, Jack Hawkins and Terence Morgan, and features the first film appearance by Jane Asher. In the US the film was released as The Story of Mandy, later also distributed as Crash of Silence.

The Gentle Gunman (1952)

The Gentle Gunman is a black-and-white 1952 Ealing Studios drama film, directed by Basil Dearden and starring John Mills and Dirk Bogarde.

The Titfield Thunderbolt (1953)

The Titfield Thunderbolt is a 1953 British comedy film about a group of villagers trying to keep their branch line operating after British Railways decided to close it. The film was written by T.E.B. Clarke and was inspired by the restoration of the narrow gauge Talyllyn Railway in Wales, the world's first heritage railway run by volunteers.

The Cruel Sea (1953)

The Cruel Sea is a 1953 British war film starring Jack Hawkins, Donald Sinden, Denholm Elliott, Stanley Baker, Liam Redmond, Virginia McKenna and Moira Lister. The film, which was made by Ealing Studios seven years after the end of the Second World War, was directed by Charles Frend and produced by Leslie Norman. It is based on the best selling novel of the same name by former naval officer Nicholas Monsarrat, though the screenplay by Eric Ambler omits some of Monsarrat's grimmest moments.

The Square Ring (1953)

The Square Ring is a 1953 British film produced by Michael Relph, directed by Basil Dearden and made at Ealing Studios. It stars Jack Warner, Robert Beatty and Bill Owen. The film, based on a stage play by Ralph Peterson, centres on one night at a fairly seedy boxing venue and tells the different stories of the various fighters and spectators.

Meet Mr. Lucifer (1953)

Meet Mr. Lucifer is a black and white British comedy satire film released in 1953 starring Stanley Holloway. It was filmed at Ealing Studios, London, and is one of the Ealing Comedies. The film is based on the play Beggar My Neighbour by Arnold Ridley (who later played Private Godfrey in the BBC television comedy series Dad's Army).

The Love Lottery (1954)

The Love Lottery is a 1954 Ealing Studios comedy film, directed by Charles Crichton and starring David Niven. The film examines celebrity and fan worship with an international setting including Lake Como, ambitious dream sequences, and an uncredited cameo appearance at the end by Humphrey Bogart as himself.

The Maggie (1954)

The Maggie (released in the U.S. as High and Dry) is a 1954 British comedy film produced by Ealing Studios. Directed by Alexander Mackendrick and written by William Rose, it is a story of a clash of cultures between a hard-driving American businessman and a wily Scottish captain.

The Rainbow Jacket (1954)

The Rainbow Jacket is a 1954 British Ealing Studios drama film, produced by Michael Relph, directed by Basil Dearden, and featuring Robert Morley, Kay Walsh, Bill Owen, Honor Blackman and Sid James.

Lease of Life (1954)

Lease of Life is a 1954 British film drama made by Ealing Studios and directed by Charles Frend. The film was designed as a star-vehicle for Robert Donat, representing his return to the screen after an absence of over three years during which he had been battling the chronic asthma which plagued his life and career. It was a prestige production which was generally respectfully, if not over-enthusiastically, received and gained Donat a nomination as 'Best British Actor' at the 1955 British Academy Film Awards. In common with a number of other Ealing films of the era, Lease of Life focuses on a specific English milieu – in this case a Yorkshire village and its nearby cathedral city – and examines the nuances, quirks and foibles of its day-to-day life. The film is unique in the Ealing canon in having religion as its dominant theme.

The Divided Heart (1954)

The Divided Heart is a black-and-white British film directed by Charles Crichton and released in 1954. The film is a drama, based on a true story of a child whose father was a member of Slovenian Partisans executed by Nazis and whose mother was deported to Auschwitz. Little Ivan was sent to Germany in a Nazi program known as Lebensborn, like the 300 other babies and young children from Slovenia whose parents were declared Banditen by Nazis.

Out of the Clouds (1955)

Out of the Clouds is a 1955 British drama film directed by Basil Dearden, and starring Anthony Steel, Robert Beatty and James Robertson Justice. An Ealing Studios production, the film is composed of small stories dealing with the passengers and crew on a day at London Airport (the name of Heathrow Airport 1946–1966).

The Night My Number Came Up (1955)

The Night My Number Came Up is a 1955 British supernatural drama film directed by Leslie Norman with the screenplay written by R. C. Sherriff. The plot is based on a real incident in the life of British Air Marshal Sir Victor Goddard; his journal was published in The Saturday Evening Post of 26 May 1951. The film stars Michael Redgrave, Sheila Sim and Alexander Knox. This was Sim's final film before her retirement from acting.

The Ship That Died of Shame (1955)

The Ship That Died of Shame, released in the United States as PT Raiders, is a black-and-white 1955 Ealing Studios crime film directed by Basil Dearden and starring George Baker, Richard Attenborough and Bill Owen. The film is based on a story written by Nicholas Monsarrat (better known as the author of The Cruel Sea), which originally appeared in Lilliput magazine in 1952. It was later published in a collection of short stories, The Ship That Died of Shame and other stories, in 1959.

Touch and Go (1955)

Touch and Go (U.S. The Light Touch) is a 1955 British comedy film directed by Michael Truman and starring Jack Hawkins, Margaret Johnston, and June Thorburn. The film was made by Ealing Studios. The film was indifferently received on release and is not generally included in the canon of classic Ealing Comedies. It did however pick up two nominations at the 1956 British Academy Film Awards: Margaret Johnston for 'Best British Actress' and William Rose for 'Best British Screenplay' – Rose did win that year's screenplay award but for another Ealing film, The Ladykillers.

The Ladykillers (1955)

The Ladykillers is a 1955 British black comedy film made by Ealing Studios. Directed by Alexander Mackendrick, it stars Alec Guinness, Cecil Parker, Herbert Lom, Peter Sellers, Danny Green, Jack Warner and Katie Johnson as the old lady.

The Feminine Touch (1956)

The Feminine Touch is a 1956 British drama film directed by Pat Jackson and starring George Baker, Belinda Lee and Delphi Lawrence. The film is based on the bestselling novel A Lamp Is Heavy by Canadian former nurse Sheila Mackay Russell, and consequently it was released as A Lamp Is Heavy in Canada, while it was given the title The Gentle Touch in the United States, when it was released there in December 1957.

Who Done It? (1956)

Who Done It? is a 1956 British comedy film starring comedian Benny Hill and Belinda Lee.

The Long Arm (1956)

The Long Arm (USA: The Third Key) is a 1956 British film noir police procedural crime film starring Jack Hawkins. The film, which is based on a screenplay by Robert Barr, was directed by Charles Frend and produced by Michael Balcon. It was shot on location in London and Snowdonia in North Wales.

The Man in the Sky (1957)

The Man in the Sky (released in the U.S. as Decision Against Time) is a 1957 film starring Jack Hawkins and produced by Ealing Films, Michael Balcon's new company, set up after Rank had sold Ealing Studios in Ealing Green, West London, to the BBC in 1955. Balcon, who had run the company on behalf of Rank since 1944, left Rank in 1956 and set up the new company, striking a distribution and production deal with MGM. This was the first Ealing production to be made at MGM-British Studios in Borehamwood, North London.

The Shiralee (1957)

The Shiralee is a 1957 British film made by Ealing Studios, directed by Leslie Norman and based on the novel by D'Arcy Niland. Although all exterior scenes were filmed in Sydney, Scone (where the film had its Australasian premiere) and Binnaway, New South Wales and Australian actors Charles Tingwell, Bill Kerr and Ed Devereaux played in supporting roles, the film is really a British film made in Australia, rather than an Australian film.

Barnacle Bill (1957)

Barnacle Bill (released in the US as All at Sea) is a 1957 Ealing Studios comedy film, starring Alec Guinness. He plays an unsuccessful Royal Navy officer, and six of his maritime ancestors. This was the penultimate Ealing comedy as well as the last film Guinness made for Ealing Studios. By coincidence, his first Ealing success was Kind Hearts and Coronets (1949), in which he also played multiple roles. The film was written by the screenwriter of Passport to Pimlico.

Davy (1957)

Davy is a 1958 British comedy-drama film directed by Michael Relph and starring Harry Secombe, Alexander Knox and Ron Randell. It was the last comedy to be made by Ealing Studios and had the distinction of being the first British film in Technirama. Davy was intended to launch the solo career of Harry Secombe, who was already a popular British radio personality on The Goon Show, but it was only moderately successful.

Dunkirk (1958)

Dunkirk is a 1958 British war film directed by Leslie Norman and starring John Mills, Richard Attenborough and Bernard Lee. The film is based on the novels The Big Pick-Up by Elleston Trevor and Dunkirk co-authored by Lt. Col. Ewan Hunter and Maj. J. S. Bradford.

Nowhere to Go (1958)

Nowhere to Go is a 1958 British crime film directed by Seth Holt, his directorial debut. It stars George Nader, Maggie Smith (receiving her first screen credit), Bernard Lee, Harry H. Corbett and Lionel Jeffries. After a criminal escapes from jail, his attempts to recover his stashed loot end in failure, as he is shunned by the criminal community and hunted down by the police.

The Siege of Pinchgut (1959)

The Siege of Pinchgut (released in the US as Four Desperate Men) is a 1959 British thriller filmed on location in Sydney, Australia and directed by Harry Watt. It was the last film produced by Ealing Studios, and was entered into the 9th Berlin International Film Festival where it was nominated for the Golden Bear Award.

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JLL

Michael P Davis
Michael.P.Davis@eu.jll.com
+44 (0) 20 7399 5782

Stuart Austin
stuart.austin@eu.jll.com
+44 (0) 20 3147 1112

Knight Frank

Roddy Abram
roddy.abram@knightfrank.com
+44 (0) 20 7861 1280

Ian McCarter
Ian.McCarter@knightfrank.com
+44 (0) 20 7861 150


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